Why Do We Need Collagen?

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Collagen is the “glue” that holds your body together, says Angelone. It makes up about one-third of the protein in your body. Thing is, your body produces less collagen starting in your thirties and forties. Collagen peptides added to your diet may serve to replace what your body begins to lack as you age and support your overall health.

Your body works hard to digest protein from sources like chicken or beef, and some people may find that they deal with digestive symptoms like burping or stomach pain after a meal, explains Lachman. But collagen supplements are hydrolyzed, meaning the collagen is broken down, a process that makes it easier for your body to digest. Collagen supplements may potentially be a more comfortable way to get protein into your diet, she says. The process of hydrolyzing also allows collagen peptides to dissolve in water, which makes it relatively simple to use them in everyday foods (like water or smoothies).

Skin health is the most well-researched benefit of taking collagen. Researchers analyzed 11 randomized, placebo-controlled studies of more than 800 patients who took up to 10 grams (g) per day of collagen with the goal of improving skin health. The results? The supplements were shown to improve skin elasticity, help it better hold onto moisture, and rev the density of collagen fibres within the skin. “Ten grams per day is a small scoop,” says Lachman — and it could be a small step in preserving a youthful appearance.

Joint pain can make it difficult to exercise, which can knock you off the path toward your goals. Taking a collagen supplement may help you get back on track. “There is some evidence that collagen can be great for supporting connective tissues and improving joint pain after exercise,” says Angelone. For instance, a study found that athletes with knee pain who took 5 g of collagen peptides daily for 12 weeks had less joint pain during exercise compared with a placebo group. Oral collagen may support cartilage repair and may also have an anti-inflammatory effect.

In inflammatory digestive conditions, such as irritable bowel disease (IBD), there is a “gut healing” theory about collagen. “Some research finds that collagen levels are decreased in patients with these conditions. By taking collagen, you would help correct a deficiency,” says Lachman.

Research has shown that among IBD patients, there was an imbalance between the formation and breakdown of collagen fibres, and this was connected to inflammation. Past research also shows that IBD patients have decreased serum levels of type 4 collagen. Collagen is a part of connective tissue, which makes up your colon and GI tract, so by bringing your levels up, there may be a supportive environment for your body to heal.

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